Quick Tip Tuesdays: ‘Define a Word’ Shortcut

This is the first of what will be a series of “Quick Tip Tuesday” posts. We’ll cover all sorts of helpful tricks from the most useful shortcuts on OS X and iOS devices to hidden settings none but those who have been in the bowels of the Genius Room at Apple know of.

Today’s quick tip is how to quickly pull up the definition of a word in almost any app.

This will only work in Cocoa-based apps. For beginners out there, this means the majority of apps that came on your machine or could get in the Mac App Store.

  • If you have a trackpad (either a laptop, or an iMac without a mouse): Rest your cursor on the word you want to define. With 3 fingers, (lightly) tap twice on your trackpad. It may take some practice.Try this word out:

Apologetics

  • If you don’t have a trackpad, the shortcut is quite easy too. Just like before, rest your cursor on the word. The keyboard shortcut is Command + control + D. Think “Define” or “Dictionary”.

The definition will pop up along with the Thesaurus, and even a Wikipedia article if you have an internet connection.

Have a tip you’d like to share? Add it in the comments below and maybe I’ll feature it in a future post.

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Apple Rumors and Retail Employees

I worked at the magical land of white and aluminium for over 4 years, and during that time I gained an interesting perspective. I left in November and have been happier at my new job, not because Apple is a bad place to work (in fact, I don’t think there’s a better retail employer out there), but because it was nearly 5 years of retail. That’s not the way I would have chosen to provide for a future family (Lord willing), and it was also seriously cutting into my ability to serve well at my church-especially on Sundays. Dang retail hours…

So how secretive were they?

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What’s in a Name?

For the regular church-goer, theology is often a frightening word. It connotes lofty speech that is yawn-inspiring, manipulative, or devisive (depending on your experience). I aim to change that.

Theology simply means “the study of the truth of God.” From the Christian worldview, we’re talking about Jesus. Anything about Jesus is theological by nature. So, when I’m talking about Jesus, or the church, it’s Technically Theology. Follow?
Seeing Him and what He’s done is meant to fill us with awe, which leads to doxology [praise of His glory].

I’ve also worked in the technology industry for over 5 years now, and I’ve come to love the gadgets that just work. Especially when they work for those who aren’t in that field. I won’t deceive you, I’m a bit biased toward apple-flavored goodies, but I can still appreciate other well-made tools. I’ll certainly focus on how to use them to tell others the truth about what Christ did on the cross, so you too can be Technically Theological. We’ll also look at high quality apps out there, best practices for buying/using these shiny toys, and rumors of rumors.

These are two things I know and seem to talk with people about most: Reformed Theology-specifically what Christ did as our substitute at the cross and the wonderful implications of that event, and technology that helps us tell others about it. I just thought I’d put it all in one place.
Feel free to comment, disagree, expand, whatever. I don’t have it all figured out. In fact, nearly all of what is on this website is something a wiser man said. I’m just parroting it. Hope some of you find it helpful.

Soli Deo Gloria.

Your young fool,

Jeff Albright

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It was inevitable.

I had to start at some point. Blogging has been going on since around 1994. I was only 5 then, but I’ve got most people around me thinking I’m “technically savvy”. I apologize for not beginning earlier.

The aim here is to keep an intelligent, running commentary on the Gospel, the state of the church today, and technology-especially apple flavored.

I’ll explain the name of the blog in another post soon, but for now, I’ll just say, “Hello World.”

UPDATE: Here’s the full explanation of the blog’s title: What’s in a Name?